• Pet Gazette

Blue Ridge Humane celebrates 70 years

Updated: Jan 6

Blue Ridge Humane Society is turning 70. The 2020 anniversary of the founding of the animal welfare organization reaches a golden era in 2020, adding some cheer to the year. Started by a group of citizens concerned about the care of animals in the community, the non-profit has served Henderson County pets, and their owners, in many capacities over the last seven decades.


Blue Ridge Humane will be celebrating during the month of November, with special throwbacks, and an online silent auction to help raise funds to address higher needs in our community to rescue and care for animals, provide vital and lifesaving support services, and continue standard programs and services the help provide care and treatment to those in need.


The Henderson County Humane Society was first incorporated in 1952 and built an animal shelter in 1966 on property donated by the county. The Society was briefly inactive during the late 1960’s when responsibility for managing the shelter was assumed by the county. County officials and animal welfare advocates continued to dialogue regarding issues related to animal welfare and overpopulation.

The Society was reactivated in 1972 and began to operate both an independent, limited admission shelter and a thrift store.


In 2003, the society’s name was officially changed to Blue Ridge Humane Society to better reflect the differences between our county shelter and our organization’s operations.


In 1984, eight acres of land were purchased in Henderson County in Edneyville and the Animal Shelter was built and opened in April 1989. The animal shelter is a 5,000 square foot building with a capacity of approximately 88 animals. A major animal shelter renovation was completed in 2013.


At our Adoption Center, we assess behavior and treats conditions as necessary with all animals under our care. Prior to adoption, each animal is provided with all the appropriate vaccinations, a microchip, dewormed and spayed or neutered. Screening and counseling of potential families contribute to our successful adoptions. We are committed to forging lifelong bonds between pets and people.


To learn more about available resources and programs, how you can support or get involved, visit www.blueridgehumane.org.


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